My Career in Food: Allocations Coordinator and Fieldsman

"Initially it was the challenging and diverse nature of the role that attracted me, but I soon realised that primary production was a big industry in Scotland and one I wanted to forge my career in."

Adam Young, Allocations Coordinator and Fieldsman, Agrico UK

Q: How did you get started in your career in the food industry?

A: You could say that I ended up in the food industry a little bit by chance. After graduating with a degree in Business Studies, I now work as an Allocations Coordinator and Fieldsman for Agrico UK – Europe's largest potato growing company.

Q: Allocations Coordinator and Fieldsman, what does that mean?

A: As Allocations Coordinator I work with customers to find out exactly what potato variety they are looking for, whether it is for chipping, crisping, baking etc. I have to match the customer requirements whilst considering the location, quality, age and history of each stock of potatoes.

The Fieldsman part of my job involves planning the production of seed crops, discussing the optimum agronomy programme (the science of soil management and crop production) and concluding contract discussions with suppliers and customers.

Q: What are your main responsibilities?

A: In my current role I am in charge of everything from quality and stock control, to inspecting the crop and also the allocation of orders. A key element to this is customer service and stock control and ensuring we can fulfil and meet customer expectations for their products.

Q: Why were you attracted to a role in primary production?

A: Initially it was the challenging and diverse nature of the role that attracted me, but I soon realised that primary production was a big industry in Scotland and one I wanted to forge my career in.

Q: Would you encourage others to consider a career in food?

A: Definitely, the food and drink industry is vast and much bigger than most people realise. The different elements of the industry mean that there are so many opportunities for young people to play a part in its future. Also with the need to produce 50 per cent more food by 2050 the opportunities for young people are likely to increase.

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Last reviewed: 16 Aug 2013